The Anatolian Journal of Cardiology
Original Investigation

Does coexistence of fragmented QRS and cardiovascular disease have the ability to predict the mortality in hospitalized, critically ill patients with COVID-19?

1.

Department of Cardiology, Health Sciences University, Bağcılar Training and Research Hospital; İstanbul-Turkey

2.

Department of Cardiology, Haseki Training and Research Hospital; İstanbul-Turkey

3.

Department of Cardiology, Bakırköy Dr. Sadi Konuk Educational and Research Hospital; İstanbul-Turkey

4.

Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Department of Anaesthesiology, İstanbul, Turkey

Anatol J Cardiol 2021; 25: 803-810
DOI: 10.5152/AnatolJCardiol.2021.13611
Read: 279 Downloads: 133 Published: 01 November 2021

Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the prognostic accuracy of the presence of fragmented QRS (fQRS) on baseline electrocardiogram on the adverse outcome in critical patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Methods: The current study was retrospective designed and included 169 patients who were critically ill with COVID-19 and CVD (mean age of 62±15 years). The patients were grouped into those who died (non-survivor group) and those who survived (survivor group).

Results: The non-survivors were older and more often had CVD (p=0.009), hypertension (p=0.046), diabetes (p=0.048), cancer (p=0.023), and chronic renal failure (p=0.001). Although the presence of fQRS on the basal electrocardiogram was more common in patients who died, this was not statistically significant (p=0.059). Furthermore, non-survivors had more frequent the coexistence of CVD and fQRS (p=0.029). In Model 1 multivariate regression analysis, CVD alone was not a predictor of mortality (p=0.078), whereas coexistence of CVD and fQRS was found to be an independent predictor of mortality in Model 2 analysis [hazard ratio (HR): 2.243; p=0.003]. Furthermore, older age (HR: 1.022; p=0.006 and HR: 1.023; p=0.005), cancer (HR: 1.912; p=0.021 and HR: 1.858; p=0.031), high SOFA score (HR: 1.177; p=0.003 and HR: 1.215; p<0.001), and increased CRP level (HR: 1.003; p=0.039 and HR: 1.003; p=0.027) independently predicted the mortality in both multivariate analysis models, respectively.
 

Conclusion: fQRS may be a useful and handy risk-stratification tool for clinical outcomes by identifying high-risk individuals, especially among those with CVD.

Cite this article as: Katkat F, Kalyoncuoğlu M, Karahan S, Abanus H, Turhan Çağlar FN, Karabulut D, et al. Does coexistence of fragmented QRS and cardiovascular disease have the ability to predict the mortality in hospitalized, critically ill patients with COVID-19?. Anatol J Cardiol 2021: 25; 803-10.

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ISSN 2149-2263 EISSN 2149-2271